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Front Page » February 14, 2012 » Emery County News » Funds awarded for disaster relief
Published 990 days ago

Funds awarded for disaster relief


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The U.S. Department of Agriculture's Natural Resources Conservation Service has announced more than $44 million in Emergency Watershed Protection funding is now available for several natural disasters that have occurred in Utah over the past 13 months - primarily from December 2010 flash flooding in southern Utah and from record snowpack flooding last spring in northern and central Utah.

Dave Brown, State Conservationist in the Utah NRCS office, said NRCS had received approval to go ahead with work on 13 specific sites from Cache County to Washington County.

The EWP Program was set up by Congress to respond to emergencies created by natural disasters, such as floods, fires and wind storms. The program is designed to protect life and property from any future event of a similar magnitude.These EWP projects are administered by the NRCS state office in Utah, in partnership with the local sponsors, usually county governments. EWP funding made available through NRCS bears up to 75 percent of the construction costs. The remaining 25 percent must be obtained by the local sponsor from local sources and can be in the form of cash or in-kind services.

In addition to natural resource and human protection, another positive benefit from this work is the added employment opportunities the funding provides to local contractors, governments and suppliers who carry out the restoration work. The local sponsor actually contracts the work out and NRCS provides oversight for the federal government and insures the work is done according to established engineering and environmental specifications.

"We look forward to working with the local sponsors to restore these critical natural resource systems and help make these communities whole again," said Brown. He gave the assurance that an NRCS interdisciplinary team would follow federal law in evaluating the possible impacts the work might have on natural resources, cultural resources and the socioeconomic effects associated with the possible alternatives.

Washington County ($6,590.668)

Severe storm events in December 2010 caused damage to roads, drinking water systems, homes, and other infrastructure. Sponsor contact: County Commission or Ron Whitehead, (435) 634-5780.

Kane County ($600,000)

Severe storm events in December 2010 caused damage to roads, sewer systems, and other infrastructure.

Sevier County ($3,500,000)

The 2011 snowpack was record breaking (highest ever recorded) at about 25 percent of all measured sites. The snowpack did not melt until extremely late causing record high stream flows. These high stream flows caused damages to roads, irrigation structures, homes, and bridges. Sponsor contact: County Commission or John Hunt, (435) 979-4081.

Garfield County ($500,000)

The 2011 snowpack was record breaking (highest ever recorded) at about 25 percent of all measured sites. The snowpack did not melt until extremely late causing record high stream flows. These high stream flows caused damages to a large irrigation structure. Sponsor contact: County Commission or Brian Bremmner, (435) 676-1119.

Piute County ($1,500,000)

Damages to four irrigation structures related to the 2011 snowpack melting. Sponsor contact: County Commission or Cory Fautin, (435) 616-3300.

Spanish Fork City ($500,000)

Stream bank erosion due to runoff resulted in damages to infrastructure.

Duchesne County ($4,000,000)

The record breaking snowpack did not melt until extremely late causing record high stream flows. These high stream flows caused damages to roads, irrigation structures, homes, and bridges. Sponsor contact: County Commission or Mike Lefler, (435) 738-1181.

Cache County ($6,000,000)

The record breaking snowpack did not melt until extremely late causing record high stream flows in Logan City, Providence City, and other surrounding communities in Cache County. These high stream flows caused damages to roads, irrigation structures, homes, bridges, and other infrastructure. Sponsor contact: County Executive or Rick Williams, (435) 755-1059.

Sanpete County ($2,500,000)

The record breaking snowpack did not melt until extremely late causing record high stream flows in Manti, Ephraim, and other surrounding communities in Sanpete County. These high stream flows caused damages to roads, irrigation structures, homes, bridges, and other infrastructure. Sponsor contact: County Commission.

Green River Soil Conservation District ($1,500,000)

High flows due to snowmelt caused damages near Green River to irrigation infrastructure and roads.

Northern Utah Water Conservancy District ($500,000)

High flows due to snowmelt caused damages and erosion to infrastructure near Dry Creek Reservoir.

Weber County ($13,000,000)

The record breaking snowpack did not melt until extremely late causing record high stream flows along the Weber River in several communities and cities in Weber County. These high stream flows caused damages to roads, irrigation structures, homes, bridges, and other infrastructure. Sponsor contact: County Commission or Lance Peterson, (801) 778-6682.

For further information about this program and these projects, contact your local NRCS office or visit the Utah NRCS Web site at www.ut.nrcs.usda.gov.

USDA is an equal opportunity provider, employer and lender. To file a complaint of discrimination, write to USDA, Director, Office of Civil Rights, 1400 Independence Ave., S.W., Washington, DC 20250-9410, or call (800) 795-3272 (Voice) or (202) 720-6382 (TDD)

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