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Project for re-development of Rilda springs

The old water gathering system was removed and it was more than 40 years old.
The new system is already gathering more water.

North Emery Water Special Service District has spent some time this fall redeveloping the Rilda Springs in Huntington Canyon. These springs are the primary source of water for the North Emery culinary water system which serves northern Emery County. The project is being completed with grant and loan money from the CIB.

The Rilda Project by North Emery Water Users has been a long time coming. Rilda was originally developed in about 1971 as North Emery was being formed as a private company. The spring has had several maintenance projects over the years to keep the spring functional, but none of the previous projects were funded enough to capture all of the water that is available at the spring.

The location of the Rilda Springs is located on property that was originally a coal mine from the 1940s to the 1960s. As a result of this early mining activity, redevelopment of the site is challenging. There are topsoil piles from the mines that have to be avoided and they always have to be on the lookout for other challenges that the mining has created.

The current project will allow the District to replace all of the aging perforated pipe in the system and to build new underground bentonite dams to ensure the water is directed to the water collection pipes. In addition, the transmission pipes in the spring area are being re-aligned to match the new collection acres. Finally, new collection boxes and modern man holes are being added to provide better access to the spring collection acres for regular maintenance.

The Rilda Spring redevelopment project is the first of a two phase project that was funded by the CIB. The second phase will be a new pipeline project in between Lawrence and Cleveland to increase flows in the system and to provide redundancy to users of the system. The second phase should be completed in the first half of 2013. The total CIB package that was funded included a $200,000 loan and a grant of approximately $1 million.




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