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Pioneer Tales, Fun Songs and Cowboy Poetry at Museum Openhouse

By COREY BLUEMEL
Staff Writer

Cadence Tuttle, first attendant, Meagan Rogers, Miss Emery 2003 and Tawni Bigelow, second attendant.

Key Ingredients, the Smithsonian's traveling exhibit that has been on display for the past month at the Museum of the San Rafael, finished its visit with an evening of pioneer tales, fun songs and cowboy poetry.

Jan Petersen expressed her gratitude for the turnout for this display sponsored by the Utah Humanities Council. "It has been an exciting month," she said. "This exhibit opened on May 25 and already this is our last program. This exhibit and accompanying presentations have provided much 'Food for Thought,'" said Petersen.

The June 24 presentation began with Sam DeLeeuw, a cowboy poet from Sanpete County, who began by explaining that she writes all the poems she performs. DeLeeuw began with a poem about her "New Love." This poem was about her grandson. She then recanted a story about "Hilda and the Tornado," inspired when a tornado hit Manti a few years ago.

Evelyn Huntsman was introduced and sang "True Blue Bill" and "Sally Simpkins."

DeLeeuw returned with two more poems, "Don't Weep for Me" and "Sunshine."

Sam Singleton, of Ferron, began by telling the audience about his childhood in Ferron as the son of a storekeeper. His great-grandfather had been called to open a co-op store in Ferron in the late 1800s. He sold his herd of cattle which he had been herding in Emery County and went to Salt Lake to purchase the goods for the store.

On his return with the goods, he began the co-op store. Soon after 1900, he built the building that still stands today. Singleton related several stories of the pioneer adventures of early Emery County.

Evelyn Huntsman continued the program by singing three more songs, "Does the Spearmint lose its Flavor on the Bedpost Overnight?", "Strychnine," and "I'm My Own Grandpa."

DeLeeuw recited three more poems. The first about a four-letter word, "Diet." The next one was "Hilda's Bloomers" and she finished with "Harley's Helper."

For the final taster's table, Petersen chose a treat she enjoyed as a child. She explained that she had to guess at the recipe. The audience was invited to sample "Red Mush." Along with the red mush, there were snickerdoodles and oatmeal raisin cookies, just like Grandma used to make.





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